Without evidence of benefit, an intervention should not be presumed to be beneficial or safe.

- Rogue Medic

Homeopathic Product Recalled for Containing Real Medicine


 

Homeopathic products are supposed to be diluted down to where they contain nothing.

They definitely are not supposed to contain antibiotics, since antibiotics were not understood when Samuel Hahnemann made up the idea of homeopathy.
 

FDA has determined that these products have the potential to contain penicillin or derivatives of penicillin, which may be produced during the fermentation process. In patients who are allergic to beta-lactam antibiotics, even at low levels, exposure to penicillin can result in a range of allergic reactions from mild rashes to severe and life-threatening anaphylactic reactions.[1]

 

The law of similars. Find a poison that produces similar symptoms, preferably not the cause of the illness (not that a homeopath would know) and dilute the poison down to nothing.

The water (or alcohol) is expected to remember the poison, but forget everything else that has been in the water, and magically cure the illness by doing the opposite of what the poison would do.

The water is diluted to 1% of what was in it enough times that there should not be any poison left. The homeopath also hits the water a lot to teach the water to remember the poison. This is the magic memory of water.

The result is nothing.
 


Image credit.
 

When blood-letting was a common treatment, this was better than going to a doctor, but still not as good as staying at home and saving your money, because who needs to go buy nothing?

The idea that the more dilute the solution, the more potent the “medicine” is ridiculous. Somebody would be able to demonstrate the differences in strengths, but homeopathy is just another placebo with just another excuse to scam people.

At what concentration of nothing does it start to work?

At what concentration of nothing does it become dangerous?

Is it still a solution when there is nothing in it?

 

Hover text –

Dear editors of Homeopathy Monthly: I have two small corrections for your July issue. One, it’s spelled “echinacea”, and two, homeopathic medicines are no better than placebos and your entire magazine is a sham.[2]

 

One of the problems with dealing with a fraud is the inability to tell the difference between incompetence and intentional fraud.

Homeopath X is a true believer. He believes that homeopathy works, but is too incompetent to keep real medicine out of his nothing.

Homeopath XX is willing to sell anything that pays. He knows that homeopathy is nonsense, but wants to add real medicine to make it seem that the water is having some sort of effect beyond a placebo effect. He adds real medicine after the dilution for that effect. This is not rare.

Homeopaths claim that their medicines are safe and that real medicines are dangerous, so why add medicine?

Since homeopathy is all lies, should we believe anything a homeopath says?

If you dilute a lie enough times, does it become truth?

We have enough problems with believing in magic with real medicines without adding the problems of homeopathy, where there is nothing real except fraud.

Footnotes:

[1] Pleo Homeopathic Drug Products by Terra-Medica: Recall – Potential for Undeclared Penicillin – Includes Pleo-FORT, Pleo-QUENT, Pleo-NOT, Pleo-STOLO, Pleo-NOTA-QUENT, and Pleo-EX
Posted 03/20/2014
FDA
Safety Alert

[2] dilution
xkcd
Comic

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