Without evidence of benefit, an intervention should not be presumed to be beneficial or safe.

- Rogue Medic

2016 – Amiodarone is Useless, but Ketamine Gets Another Use

amiodarone-edit-1
 

I didn’t write a lot in 2016, but 2016 may have been the year we put the final nail in the coffin of amiodarone. Two major studies were published and both were very negative for amiodarone.

If we give enough amiodarone to have an effect on ventricular tachycardia, it will usually be a negative effect.[1]

Only 38% of ventricular tachycardia patients improved after amiodarone, but 48% had major adverse cardiac events after amiodarone.

There are better drugs, including adenosine, sotalol, procainamide, and ketamine for ventricular tachycardia. Sedation and cardioversion is a much better choice. Cardioversion is actually expected after giving amiodarone.

For cardiac arrest, amiodarone is not any better than placebo or lidocaine. What ever happened to the study of amiodarone that was showing such wonderful results over a decade ago? It still hasn’t been published, so it is reasonable to conclude that the results were negative for amiodarone. It is time to make room in the drug bag for something that works.[2],[3]

On the other hand, now that we have improved the quality of CPR by focusing on compressions, rather than drugs, more patients are waking up while chest compressions are being performed, but without spontaneous circulation, so ketamine has another promising use. And ketamine is still good for sedation for intubation, for getting a patient to tolerate high flow oxygen, for agitated delirium, for pain management, . . . .[4],[5]

Masimo’s RAD 57 still doesn’t have any evidence that it works well on real patients.[6]

When intubating, breathe. Breathing is good. Isn’t inability to breathe the reason for intubation?[7]

Footnotes:

[1] The PROCAMIO Trial – IV Procainamide vs IV Amiodarone for the Acute Treatment of Stable Wide Complex Tachycardia
Wed, 17 Aug 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[2] Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Mon, 04 Apr 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[3] Dr. Kudenchuk is Misrepresenting ALPS as ‘Significant’
Tue, 12 Apr 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[4] What do you do when a patient wakes up during CPR?
Tue, 08 Mar 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[5] Ketamine For Anger Management
Sun, 06 Mar 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[6] The RAD-57 – Still Unsafe?
Wed, 03 Feb 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

[7] Should you hold your breath while intubating?
Tue, 19 Jan 2016
Rogue Medic
Article

.

What do you do when a patient wakes up during CPR?

ResearchBlogging.org
 

The return of consciousness without the return of a pulse is still rare, but may be more common with our increased focus on high quality chest compressions. There is still no evidence that interrupting chest compressions, for anything other than defibrillation, improves outcomes.

Is this due to the consistency of the machine? Maybe. Maybe not. We do not have enough evidence to draw that conclusion.

Is this growing population really growing? Maybe. Maybe not. We do not have enough evidence to draw that conclusion, either.

It could be that with the ability to use a cell phone camera to record these instances, there is more credibility to the reports. There is a suggestion that this could be common.
 

Parnia et al. conducted a multi-year, multi-center, prospective study of the frequency of awareness during resuscitation by interviewing cardiac arrest survivors after discharge. They found 55/140 (39%) had perceptions of awareness of being alive and even memories that originated during that time.2 [1]

 

Should we be giving ketamine to these patients?
 

Nebraska EMS CPR Sedation Protocol - ALS
Nebraska CPR Induced Consciousness Sedation Protocol (from the PDF)[1]
 

We should find out how common it is for people to regain consciousness without regaining a pulse. This is clearly an experimental protocol that is not supported by evidence of improved outcomes that matter – just like all of the rest of cardiac arrest treatment that is not compressions or defibrillation.
 

RESULTS: The search yielded 1997 unique records, of which 50 abstracts were reviewed. Nine reports, describing 10 patients, were relevant. Six of the patients had CPR performed by mechanical devices, three of these patients were sedated. Four patients arrested in the out-of-hospital setting and six arrested in hospital. There were four survivors. Varying levels of consciousness were described in all reports, including purposeful arm movements, verbal communication, and resuscitation interference. Management strategies directed at consciousness were offered to six patients and included both physical and chemical restraints.[2]

 

6/1,997 is 0.3% – not anywhere near the 39.3% of 55/140, but it is still a large enough group that we should not ignore them.

Depression and anxiety following resuscitation are significant problems, so this might even be a way to help decrease those resuscitation side effects.
 

CONCLUSION:
One fourth of OHCA-survivors reported symptoms of anxiety and/or depression at 6 months which was similar to STEMI-controls and previous normative data. Subjective cognitive problems were associated with an increased risk for psychological distress. Since psychological distress affects long-term prognosis of cardiac patients in general it should be addressed during follow-up of survivors with OHCA due to a cardiac cause.
[3]

 

The similarity to the outcome of STEMI (ST segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction) patients do not inspire confidence in this approach, but that does not mean that it should not be examined.

It is most important that we not make the mistake that has been made with ventilations, endotracheal tubes, extraglottic airways, antiarrhythmic drugs, pressor drugs, anti-acidosis drugs, antidote drugs, anti-hypoglycemic drugs, et cetera. We should insist that there be valid evidence of some sort of benefit before the ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) Committee of Failed Treatments adds this to the ACLS algorithms because of an abundance of wishful thinking.
 

This time will be different.
 

This use of ketamine is interesting. Ketamine is a sedative that should not depress vital signs, so it may do what we expect. There may be more benefit than harm, but there may be more harm than benefit, or there may be all harm and no benefit. We will not know until we have valid research.

We have added the other treatments without finding out if they improve outcomes. We continue to remove these treatments as we obtain evidence, because they have one thing in common – they don’t improve outcomes.

These treatments have increased the ignorance of those who work in EMS (Emergency Medical Services) and EM (Emergency Medicine). We keep convincing ourselves that we know what we are doing, but evidence keeps showing that we are lying to ourselves.

Maybe ketamine sedation during compressions will be beneficial. It is such a small patient population, that it will be difficult to study. Introducing a treatment without studying it will always be a mistake. Is Nebraska studying this? Probably, but it is not stated in the paper. Has this been approved by an IRB (Institutional Review Board)? I do not know.

Footnotes:

[1] CPR induced consciousness: It’s time for sedation protocols for this growing population
Rice, D., Nudell, N., Habrat, D., Smith, J., & Ernest, E. (2016). Resuscitation DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.02.013
Free Full Text from Resuscitation.

[2] Return of consciousness during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A systematic review.
Olaussen A, Shepherd M, Nehme Z, Smith K, Bernard S, Mitra B.
Resuscitation. 2015 Jan;86:44-8. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.10.017. Epub 2014 Nov 4. Review.
PMID: 25447435

[3] Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.
Lilja G, Nilsson G, Nielsen N, Friberg H, Hassager C, Koopmans M, Kuiper M, Martini A, Mellinghoff J, Pelosi P, Wanscher M, Wise MP, Östman I, Cronberg T.
Resuscitation. 2015 Dec;97:68-75. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.09.389. Epub 2015 Oct 9.
PMID: 26433116

Rice, D., Nudell, N., Habrat, D., Smith, J., & Ernest, E. (2016). CPR induced consciousness: It’s time for sedation protocols for this growing population Resuscitation DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.02.013

Olaussen A, Shepherd M, Nehme Z, Smith K, Bernard S, & Mitra B (2015). Return of consciousness during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A systematic review. Resuscitation, 86, 44-8 PMID: 25447435

Lilja G, Nilsson G, Nielsen N, Friberg H, Hassager C, Koopmans M, Kuiper M, Martini A, Mellinghoff J, Pelosi P, Wanscher M, Wise MP, Östman I, & Cronberg T (2015). Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors. Resuscitation, 97, 68-75 PMID: 26433116

.

What is the Best Way to Manage Cardiac Arrest According to the Evidence?

ResearchBlogging.org
 
There is an excellent review article by Dr. Bentley Bobrow and Dr. Gordon Ewy on the best management of sudden cardiac arrest from the bystander to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit).

They point out something that we tend to resist learning. Cardiac arrest that is not due to respiratory causes does not need respiratory treatment. A person who is unresponsive and gasping is exhibiting signs of cardiac arrest, not signs of respiratory problems.
 

Except in newborns, gasping or agonal breathing is a common sign of cardiac arrest, occurring in slightly more than 50% of patients with primary cardiac arrest.22-25 [1]

 

Gasping does not mean alive and well. Gasping means dead and having a good chance at resuscitation. Unresponsive and gasping means there is a need for compressions.
 

If adequate chest compressions are promptly initiated, the patient will continue to gasp.23 [1]

 


 

Of interest is that only a minority of individuals with noncardiac arrest received CO-CPR.35 In Arizona, the public was generally capable of recognizing respiratory arrest, where chest compressions and assisted ventilations were recommended.[1]

 


 

It probably has less to do with taking away the ventilation, than with making the compressions continuous and high quality, but ventilations do decrease blood return to the chest and increase the likelihood of vomiting (regardless of what has been eaten), so there are benefits from removing the ventilations.
 


 

Passive oxygen insufflation means just putting a mask over the patient’s mouth and nose and allowing oxygen to be delivered passively. The rise and fall of the chest, due to compressions, and diffusion will allow for all of the oxygenation the patient will need.

Standard CPR (Std CPR) means alternating compressions with two ventilations every 30 compressions. Standard CPR is clearly not what we want to do, unless we want to keep patients from being resuscitated.
 

The problem is that the vast majority of physicians have no idea what the survival rate of patients with OHCA is in their area. This needs to change if major progress is to be made.[1]

 

Many of us do not know the results of what we do, so it is not surprising that a lot of EMS treatment is mythological.

Medicine is a field that encourages superstition. Patients provide intermittent reinforcement, which may be the most effect means of creating superstitions. Intermittent reinforcement?[2]
 

The only way to know the effectiveness of your Emergency Medical System is to know the survival of patients with OHCA and a shockable rhythm. If it is less than 38%,they should be encouraged to institute CCR and reevaluate the results.[1]

 

Maybe you are already doing better than 38% walking out of the hospital, then you are probably already using continuous compressions and passive oxygen insufflation. If you are not, then you need to improve your patient care.

Footnotes:

[1] Cardiocerebral Resuscitation: An Approach to Improving Survival of Patients With Primary Cardiac Arrest.
Ewy GA, Bobrow BJ.
J Intensive Care Med. 2014 Jul 30. pii: 0885066614544450. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 25077491 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

[2] Intermittent reinforcements
Wikipedia
Article
 

Pigeons experimented on in a scientific study were more responsive to intermittent reinforcements, than positive reinforcements.[16] In other words, pigeons were more prone to act when they only sometimes could get what they wanted. This effect was such that behavioral responses were maximized when the reward rate was at 50% (in other words, when the uncertainty was maximized), and would gradually decline toward values on either side of 50%.[17] R.B Sparkman, a journalist specialized on what motivates human behavior, claims this is also true for humans, and may in part explain human tendencies such as gambling addiction.[18]

 

Ewy, G., & Bobrow, B. (2014). Cardiocerebral Resuscitation: An Approach to Improving Survival of Patients With Primary Cardiac Arrest Journal of Intensive Care Medicine DOI: 10.1177/0885066614544450

.

Resuscitation characteristics and outcomes in suspected drug overdose-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

ResearchBlogging.org
 

This study is interesting for several reasons.

In a system that claims excellence, the most consistent way to identify the study group is by documentation of a protocol violation – but it is not intended as a study of protocol violations.

This may hint at some benefit from epinephrine (Adrenaline in Commonwealth countries), but that would require some study and we just don’t study epinephrine. We only make excuses for not studying epinephrine.

The atropine results suggest that the epinephrine data may be just due to small numbers, or that we may want to consider atropine for drug overdose cardiac arrest patients, or . . . .

The Sodium Bicarbonate (bicarb – NaHCO3) results suggest a flaw in EMS education (probably testing, too). If the patient is acidotic, this is one type of cardiac arrest where hyperventilation may be beneficial. Bicarb is the part of the drug that doesn’t do much, especially if the patient is dead. The sodium is what works, such as when the patient has taken too much of a sodium channel blocker, such as a tricyclic antidepressant or a class I antiarrhythmic. Acidosis is treated by hyperventilation. Use capnography.

Most important – antidotes probably don’t work as expected during cardiac arrest. Not even naloxone (Narcan).
 

Despite clear differences in the etiology of suspected OD [OverDose] and non-OD OHCA [Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest], the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation guidelines published in 2010 do not specify different treatments for suspected OD-OHCA patients during resuscitation,and state that there is no evidence promoting the intra-arrest administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone.8 [1]

 

What did they find in the study?

They may have located the highest concentration of heroin overdose in the country. 93% of OD-OHCA patients were treated with naloxone.
 

We relied on either naloxone administration or clear description of circumstantial evidence in the PCR [Patient Care Recod] to identify a suspected OD. Clear descriptions are also rare, and most (93%) of the cases were identified by naloxone administration. Naloxone during cardiac arrest is not part of any regional protocol, and all of these administrations are deviations from recommended practice. There may be other cases in which paramedics suspected OD, but did not deviate from protocol to administer naloxone. Therefore, it is impossible to be certain whether the actual number of OD cases is larger or smaller than the reported number. However, the use of naloxone as a proxy indicator of suspected OD has been supported in the literature.11 [1]

 

The EMS approach to naloxone still appears to be –
 


Image credits – 123
 

These results seem to show better response to the prehospital drugs in the OD-OHCA patients, but that ignores the ROSC (Return Of Spontaneous Circulation) rates.
 


Click on images to make them larger.
 

Why would OD-OHCA patients do better than non-OD-OHCA patients if they get a pulse back?

The average non-OD-OHCA patient is 20+ years older. These older patients may not be as capable of recovery nor as capable of tolerating the toxicity of the drugs they were treated with.

The change after ROSC is dramatic. Is that the important point of this study?

Are they doing anything special for OD patients in the hospital, or is it just a matter of That which does not kill me by anoxic brain damage, may allow me to recover twice as often as a typical cardiac arrest patient.
 

Do drugs (antidotes, antiarrhythmics, . . . ) work the same way in dead people as in living people?
 

Pharmacologic insults are just so massive and normal metabolism and physiology so deranged that no mere mortal can make a meaningful intervention. The seriously poisoned who maintain vital signs in the ED have the best, albeit never guaranteed, chance of rescue from a modicum of antidotes and intensive supportive care.[2]

 

We should understand that normal metabolism is irrelevant to cardiac arrest.

We should understand that we do not need to ventilate adult cardiac arrest patients, when the cause is cardiac. An absence of ventilation would not be appropriate in a living adult, but dead metabolism is not normal. If something as basic as oxygen changes, when the patient is dead, how much less do we understand the behavior of other drugs in dead patients?

Footnotes:

[1] Resuscitation characteristics and outcomes in suspected drug overdose-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
Koller AC, Salcido DD, Callaway CW, Menegazzi JJ.
Resuscitation. 2014 Jun 26. pii: S0300-9572(14)00581-4. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.05.036. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 24973558 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

[2] Dissecting the ACLS Guidelines on Cardiac Arrest from Toxic Ingestions
Emergency Medicine News:
October 2011 – Volume 33 – Issue 10 – pp 16-18
doi: 10.1097/01.EEM.0000406945.05619.ca
InFocus
Roberts, James R. MD
Article

Roberts, J. (2011). InFocus: Dissecting the ACLS Guidelines on Cardiac Arrest from Toxic Ingestions Emergency Medicine News, 33 (10), 16-18 DOI: 10.1097/01.EEM.0000406945.05619.ca

Koller, A., Salcido, D., Callaway, C., & Menegazzi, J. (2014). Resuscitation characteristics and outcomes in suspected drug overdose-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Resuscitation DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.05.036

.

Remote CPR Skills Testing Online – A Crazy Idea?

ResearchBlogging.org
 

On the MedicCast, Jamie Davis interviews Roy Shaw of SUMO about a method of remote CPR certification for health care providers.
 

The Single Use Manikin Option, or SUMO™, is an AHA-compliant way of getting certified in CPR completely online.[1]

 


BlendedCPR.com
 

It looks too simple, but how complicated should we make it?

One of the problems with EMS is that we do not maintain skills that we do not use frequently. We know that we lose our skills very quickly, but we only retrain every couple of years (or every year) for the skills considered most important. If we care about our patients’ outcomes, we need to do better.
 

Not only have varying rates of skill acquisition been documented after traditional American Heart Association (AHA) training classes, but also universally poor skill performance of varying providers 3 to 6 months after CPR training has been established.11,–,15 [2]

 

Supervised on-line mannequin practice may be the most practical way for us to increase the rate of providing hands-on practice. As cameras become cheaper and smaller, as cell phones become much more interactive, we may have a way to do the same for intubation. Is there any good reason for practicing intubation less than once a month?

We need to improve our intubation, but everyone seems to think that the problem is with other medics and they do not need any practice. When the research is done, the problems continue. We like to intubate. We assume we are good at it. We hate to practice. we really like to make excuses. Our patients are the ones who are harmed. Other than bad assessment, bad intubation is probably the most deadly skill we have.
 

Training sessions occurred at entry into the study (time 0: initial skill acquisition) and then 1, 3, and 6 months after study entry.[2]

 

Each training session was less than five minutes long (one minute of testing, then two minutes of training), so the interference with work would be minimal, while the benefit would be significant.
 

In this study, lower rates of retention were observed in the training group that did not use a live instructor (automated defibrillator feedback only) compared with the group that used an instructor without automated feedback (instructor-only training).[2]

 

They suggest that the participants relied on the feedback from the automated devices and may not have learned to assess their performance themselves. During testing, the lack of machine feedback may have put them at a disadvantage. If machine feedback can be provided at the time of initiating compressions, The machine feedback could help. currently, that does not seem likely, so the use of only machine feedback is not as good an option as feedback from an instructor or from an instructor and a machine.
 

Although the automated feedback provided was targeted to CPR psychomotor skill errors, these systems do not provide constructive positive feedback. Instructors have an advantage: they were able to comment not only on skills done incorrectly, but also praise good performance.[2]

 

How well would this work in EMS?

We could make this something that is done once a week, or even at the beginning of each shift, on a different skill each time. Intubation/Airway management is the weak spot of EMS, so we could use this to improve.

If are only retraining on intubation/airway management once a year, or once every other year, we obviously are not taking patient care seriously and are trusting our luck, rather than any skill.
 

Go listen to the podcast on the Single Use Manikin Option (SUMO™) and consider if that would be a better way of recertifying. Maybe it is one way of implementing brief low-dose, high-frequency booster training in addition to recertification.

Also check out the site –

BlendedCPR.com

Footnotes:

[1] SUMO Remote CPR Skills Testing Online and Episode 392
By podmedic
June 30, 2014
MedicCast
Podcast/videocast page

[2] Low-dose, high-frequency CPR training improves skill retention of in-hospital pediatric providers.
Sutton RM, Niles D, Meaney PA, Aplenc R, French B, Abella BS, Lengetti EL, Berg RA, Helfaer MA, Nadkarni V.
Pediatrics. 2011 Jul;128(1):e145-51. doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-2105. Epub 2011 Jun 6.
PMID: 21646262 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Free Full Text from Pediatrics.

Sutton RM, Niles D, Meaney PA, Aplenc R, French B, Abella BS, Lengetti EL, Berg RA, Helfaer MA, Nadkarni V. (2011). Low-Dose, High-Frequency CPR Training Improves Skill Retention of In-Hospital Pediatric Providers PEDIATRICS, 128 (1) DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-2105d

.

FREE Webinar from Annals of Emergency Medicine, the AHA, Dr. Bentley Bobrow, Dr. Christopher Crowe, Dr. Ashish Kumar Aggarwal, and Mark Venuti (paramedic)

 

Do you have questions about the best way to perform CPR?

If this FREE webinar does not answer them, there will be time to ask questions at the end.

Tuesday, July 8th 2014, 1pm EST (17:00 Universal Time).
 

Register for FREE at this link.
 


 

Dr. Bobrow is one of the people who has been focusing on improving the quality of chest compressions and minimizing interruptions. Two things that we know about CPR are that improving the quality of compressions and minimizing pauses in compressions make a big difference in neurologically intact survival.

These two improvements may be responsible for most of the improvement in survival since the 2005 ACLS guidelines.

That is the difference between the old focus on ALS (Advanced Life Support) because everybody knows the paramedic/nurse/doctor makes all of the difference and the new focus on compressions and keep the paramedics/nurses/doctors from doing things that interfere with compressions.

We are still waiting for some evidence that resuscitation rates would not increase even more if we just kept the paramedics/nurses/doctors away from the patient until after ROSC (Return Of Spontaneous Compressions).

You can read the guidelines, and the protocols, and the research at any time, but there are not many times when you are able to ask the experts responsible for creating all of them.
 

Register for FREE at this link.
 

Tuesday, July 8th 2014, 1pm EST (17:00 Universal Time).
.